Tag Archive tomato

SABRAO Journal Volume 48 Issue 1 March 2016

This first issue for 2016 covers topics on cereals, melon, maize, rice, corn, sugarcane among others.

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SABRAO Journal Volume 47 Issue 1 March

This first issue for 2015 has articles on cabbage, wheat, corn, tomato and coriander.

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In silico profiling of proline biosynthesis and degradation related genes during fruit development of tomato

J.M. AL-KHAYRI, A.A.H. ABDEL LATEF, H.S.A. TAHA, A.S. ELDOMIATY, M.A. ABD-ELFATTAH, A.A. REZK, W.F. SHEHATA, M.I. ALMAGHASLA, T.A. SHALABY, M.N. SATTAR, M.F. AWAD, and A.A. HASSANIN

SUMMARY

Advancements in DNA sequencing technologies with decreasing costs have sparked the generation of larger gene expression datasets generated at an accelerating rate. The study aimed to visualize the spatiotemporal profiles of the tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) genes involved in L-proline biosynthesis and to show their potential functions. Increasing L-proline accumulation, through upregulation and downregulation of genes responsible for L-proline biosynthesis and degradation, plays an essential role in tomato plants suffering abiotic and biotic stress. Understanding the possible mechanism of L-proline biosynthesis and degradation needs an urgent study of the expression pattern and function of genes involved in these physiological processes. The study identified the genes governing the L-proline biosynthesis and degradation pathways and their expression profiles in 10 stages of tomato fruit development using the Tomato Expression Atlas (TEA) bioinformatic tool. The analysis showed that L-proline biosynthesis resulted from three pathways governed by six genes, while its degradation occurred in two pathways managed by three genes. The bioinformatics analysis also showed the expression of proline synthesis/degradation-related genes in fruit parts at various developmental stages. However, proline degradation-related genes showed higher expression levels than biosynthesis-related genes. This study sheds light on a recent bioinformatics tool, which will pave the way to detect early plant performance by analyzing the expression profiles of genes.

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Date published: September 2022

Keywords: Tomato, bioinformatics, L-proline accumulation genes, gene expression, proline biosynthesis genes, salinity, drought

DOI: http://doi.org/10.54910/sabrao2022.54.3.8

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Genetic diversity of Bak-kala (Etlingera elatior (Jack) R.M. SM.) in Aceh Province, Indonesia

SAUDAH, ZUMAIDAR, DARUSMAN, FITMAWATI, D.I. ROSLIM , E. JULIANTARI, ERNILASARI, and K. WALIL

SUMMARY

Torch ginger – bak-kala (Etlingera elatior (Jack) R.M.SM.) already has been proven an effective traditional medicine by tribes in Aceh Province, Indonesia. Solid primary evidence for the torch ginger, bak-kala’s medicinal properties include the healing effects experienced by the traditional tribes in Aceh, when treated for illnesses, such as, cough, fever, and sprains. Likewise, it has been proven to be a use for food ingredients, i.e., vegetables and spices to enhance the taste of food. Much of the available documented information focused on its biochemical and pharmacological aspects. Even though the utilization of bak-kala resources is mainly at the level of diversity, there is no information on its genetic diversity in Aceh. The high intensity of bak-kala utilization is not simultaneous with information on its genetic diversity. On the other hand, many uses of bak-kala are specific for certain accessions with particular benefits. The study aimed to create a classification system for bak-kala variations based on inter-simple sequence repeats (ISSR) markers and to provide information on the genetic diversity of bak-kala in Aceh Province. The 35 accessions were divided into eight populations based on the geographical locations from which they were collected. Data were recorded and analyzed using 10 ISSR primers with 77 total bands. The molecular characters divided the accessions into four major groups. As revealed by expected heterozygosity (He), genetic variability among the population showed that the Simeulu population possessed a greater level of variability than other populations. The results of the analysis of molecular variation (AMOVA) showed that the genetic variation within the population was higher (60%) than the genetic variation among populations (40%). The studies can be used to plan conservation strategies, optimal utilization of the species, and crop improvement programs in the future.

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Date published: September 2022

Keywords: Bak-kala (Etlingera elatior), diversity, genetic variability, germplasm, ISSR markers, population structure

DOI: http://doi.org/10.54910/sabrao2022.54.3.4

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